What is the total charge enclosed by a closed surface if the electric flux entering and leaving?

What is the total charge enclosed by a closed surface if the electric flux entering and leaving the surface are?

According to Gauss theorem, “the net electric flux through any closed surface is equal to the net charge inside the surface divided by ε0” .

What is the net charge inside the surface if the total flux through the surface is zero?

The net flux through a closed surface surrounding zero net charge is zero.

What will be the total electric flux from a closed surface when a charge Q is inside it?

The flux Φ of the electric field →E through any closed surface S (a Gaussian surface) is equal to the net charge enclosed (qenc) divided by the permittivity of free space (ϵ0): Φ=∮S→E⋅ˆndA=qencϵ0.

What is the electric flux for Gaussian surface a that encloses the charged particles in free space?

103Nm2C−1.

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What does it mean when flux is zero?

If there is no net charge within a closed surface, every field line directed into the surface continues through the interior and is directed outward elsewhere on the surface. The negative flux just equals in magnitude the positive flux, so that the net, or total, electric flux is zero.

When the electric flux through a closed surface is zero then the net charge inside the surface must be zero?

In a closed surface, if the net electric flux is zero, then the net electric charge will be also zero. Since electric flux is defined as the rate of flow of electric field in a closed area and if the electric flux is zero, the overall electric charge within the closed boundary will be also zero.

What is the total electric flux through a closed surface containing a 2.0 charge?

What is the total electric flux through a closed surface containing a 2.0 μC charge? Φ = q ε 0 = 2 ⋅ 1 0 − 6 8.85 ⋅ 1 0 − 12 = 0.23 M W b .

Why is flux outside a closed surface zero?

The flux due to the field lines entering is cancelled out by that of the field lines leaving. (because they have opposite signs.) This is why the flux due to external charges is zero.

Is the flux through a closed surface always zero?

The flux of a vector field through a closed surface is always zero if there is no source of the vector field in the volume enclosed by the surface.

At what condition electric flux is zero?

As stated by Lemon, electric flux through a volume enclosed by a closed surface is zero when the volume contains no net charge. Electric flux through a closed surface S is Φ=∫SE⋅nd2r. From (1), it can be concluded that when Qint=0 the electric flux is zero.

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